Today's Top Stories

It’s often said that one of man’s biggest fears is to be forgotten after he’s gone. 
If Edgar Sims could speak to us, he could explain how it feels.
Its a bright Saturday morning, and three Yazoo City High School students are out and about looking for work to make themselves some extra cash the honest way.

A broken gas line caused downtown Yazoo City to be evacuated shortly after noon Thursday.

Achieving worldwide recognition is not an easy task for many businesses, but one local franchise is jumping for joy at the reward for their hard work.
Katherine Uthoff has been named Yazoo County High School’s STAR Student.
She selected mathematics instructor Teresa Moore as STAR Teacher.
Hundreds of people from all over Yazoo and Madison counties gathered at Parkview Church of God on Wednesday to hear testimonies about the impact of drugs on young people and their families.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield. She was a member of Ellison United Methodist Church and was employed for many years at Benton Academy as teacher and Guidance Counselor.
Virginia was preceded in death by her husband; Sim James (S. J.) Dixon and her son; William Dale Dixon.
Survivors are her daughters; Linda Dixon (Steve) Heath and Diane Dixon, grandchildren; Virginia Heath (Chris) Creel, Robert Dixon Heath, Patrick Dale Dixon, and Daughter-in-law Lauren Taylor Dixon. Also surviving are her great grandchildren, Canon Wayne Creel, Christopher Hayes Creel, and Annie James Creel as well as her sister; Beverly Stubblefield Ragland.
Funeral Services will be held Wednesday, April 26 at Ellison United Methodist Church in The Vaughan Community of Yazoo County at 2 p.m. With visitation from  1 p.m. until the service. Burial will follow in Black Jack Cemetery. Stricklin-King Funeral Home of Yazoo City will handle the arrangements.
Serving as pallbearers will be Virginia's nephews; Andy Dixon, Charlie Dixon, Cham Blain, Rush Mosby, Sim Mosby, Doug Ragland, Bob Ragland and Will Alexander.
The family request memorials be made to Ellison United Methodist Church or Blackjack Baptist Church.
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Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield.
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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---
The content you're trying to view is available for Premium Content Subscribers only. Online subscription options are available and are complimentary to all existing print subscribers of The YAZOO HERALD. 
 
If you're an existing subscriber (print or digital) and already have your Username and Password, click here: http://bit.ly/1B095Lm
 
If you're an existing print subscriber and need to activate your online account, click here: http://bitly.com/1wHXqwM
 
If you're not currently a subscriber, click here for more information about our affordable online subscription options: http://bitly.com/18fdnEp
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
Funeral services were Sunday at the Crane Funeral Home Capel with Rev. Frederick Brumfield and Rev. Rick Elder officiating. Burial followed at Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church Cemetery.
She was a longtime resident of Yazoo City where she worked for the Southern Bag Corporation for 34 years before retiring as the Vice President of Human Resources. Betty was a member of Hays Creek Southern Baptist Church that enjoyed completing crossword and Sudoku puzzles.  She loved to read all different types of books and also enjoyed tending to her yard and pet dogs. 
 Survivors include two brothers and sisters-in-law,  Ben and Myra Smith of Zwolle, La.,  Mike and Tania Smith of Prairieville, La.; andnumerous nieces and nephews
 She was preceded in death by her parents B.J. Smith and Vera Wood Smith, sisters Mildred Smith and Helen Smith, sister and brother in law Mary Smith Brumfield and Elgin Brumfield and a nephew Bobby Brumfield.
 
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Betty Jane Smith, 83, of Franklinton, LA died at 12:29 am Thursday, April 20, 2017 at Forrest General Hospital in Hattiesburg.  
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
 Born to Otis and Clemmie Jones Lee in 1927, strong Christian parents and extended family as well as a close-knit community surrounded him. In fact, Caesar, and the surrounding area northeast of Picayune was settled by his Lee, Jones, and Pearson ancestors, all of whom helped establish Union Baptist Church in Pearl River County. This community and church nurtured him as a child and young man, instilling the importance of Godly living and sharing God’s love with others.  
Growing up during the Depression also influenced the character and substance of Lecil, as he was not afraid of hard work and saw the value of conservative living. As a teen during WWII he worked at Keesler Air Force Base, commuting to Biloxi with his Dad and uncle Tom to help with the war effort. Too young to enlist early in the war, Lecil eventually managed to get into the Merchant Marines. The day before his reporting date he was playing in a pick-up basketball game and broke his arm, which postponed his induction. By the time the arm had healed the war was over and he did not get to serve.
 Lecil describes getting his first and only job in 1948: “I went to Alexander Manufacturing Company in Picayune and talked to Alvin Lingenfelter, plant manager.” A large man (6’ 2”, 200 lb.) Lingenfelter was somewhat dubious, but told Lecil to go on in the shop and sweep it out. So, 5’ 3”, 110 lb. Lecil picked up a broom and started work. “I don’t reckon that he ever assigned me to a particular job…I was a flunky. I picked out jobs (in the shop) that I thought I could do, (mastered them), and they advanced me. I realized that Mr. Lingenfelter had the job I really wanted.”  He achieved that goal and much, much more at AMCO during his 63-year career. 
Enter the love of his life: Joria Janice Miller. Daughter of Ralph and Hester Smith Miller of Flat Top community, she, too, grew up surrounded by strong Christians, and shared the same values as Lecil. It was a match made in Heaven, and they were married on September 23,1949. They established their home in Picayune, both going to work each day and to church ‘just about every time the doors were open.’
By 1961 their family was complete—Kathy, Keith, Kerry, and Kendall. No children have ever had more loving, caring parents than these four.
Love of God, respect for others, responsibility, and moral character were instilled in the family through their fine examples.
By this time Lecil and Joria were key members of their community and church family. Both were Sunday School teachers; Joria played the organ at times, sang in the choir and with quartets, and organized Vacation Bible Schools and Christmas pageants, while Lecil was Sunday School Superintendent at Union Baptist Church. Sundays were important family days too, as gathering after church at Otis and Clemmie’s home to enjoy a delicious fried chicken dinner, visiting with friends and family, and just being together, built wonderful memories.
 Meanwhile, things were booming at AMCO. Management decided to relocate the plant closer to its customers in the Delta, and chose Yazoo City for their new home. Deciding that his future lay with AMCO, Lecil looked forward to being a part of this new phase of his company and career.
 While the move was emotionally hard—after all leaving family and friends is never easy—the family quickly adapted to life in their new town. Of course, as soon as the boxes were unpacked the search for a new church home began. Although very different from Union Baptist in size and congregation dynamics (Lee kinfolk dominated at Union Baptist.), First Baptist Church welcomed the Lees with open arms, and all members of the family were immediately involved in a variety of activities. Lecil and Joria both served the Lord at FBC in many capacities.
Willing workers, they shared their faith as teachers, mentors and through mission work. Lecil worked in many areas throughout his life: Deacon, Usher, Baptist Men Director, Men’s Prayer Breakfast, and service through the Missions, Prison Impact, Bus, Security, and Stewardship Committees. A strong alto, Joria was a faithful and important member of the choir, Sunday School Teacher of all ages up to Adult.
 Tithing and extra giving were always a part of their strong commitment to carrying on God’s work. Lecil and Joria were instrumental in starting and sustaining the summer youth mission trips beginning with the 1969 trip to West Virginia. Bus Driver Lecil and organizer Joria helped many find joy in ministering to others. Numerous youth mission, B.A.L.L. Club and Centrifuge trips followed, and at home, the Bus ministry expanded to include a van route Lecil and Burnell Hitt spearheaded to pick up those needing a ride to Sunday School and church. 
Building and Mission trips to Belize, Mexico, Honduras, and other Central American countries were also a part of the couple’s effort to spread the Word of God. In 1994, Lecil spent 6 weeks in Japan with 11 others building a church. That experience was fondly remembered and the builders stayed in contact with each other, having get-togethers at least once a year.
 A member of Gideon’s International, Lecil has delivered thousands of Bibles to schools and churches. And Joria participates in the Gideon’s monthly meetings and helped with organizing boxes and boxes of Bibles as they are sorted prior to distribution.
Ups and downs in the agricultural economy affected AMCO, but Lecil’s strong leadership, hard work, and innovation kept the company viable. Although he did not have an engineering degree, Lecil’s innate technical talents were critical in the development of new products for AMCO. Named plant manager in 1969, he saw the company through many crises both with personnel and corporate changes. Retiring in 2011, Lecil continued as a Consultant to AMCO for several more years. 
A long-time member of Rotary International and a Paul Harris Fellow, Plus 1 Lecil served his club and, in turn, his community through many service projects and committees.  He served on Economic Development and Tourism committees as well as serving many years on the Zoning Board and Christmas in July building projects for the needy. 
An avid photographer, Lecil documented both the important and mundane events of life, using his camera skills to capture new AMCO products as they were developed, sights both beautiful and unusual, holidays, celebrations, and milestones. Joria’s creative side was displayed in floral arrangements, costume design and construction, ceramics, painting, dolls, pillows embroidery,  quilting, and cake decorating. Both enjoyed traveling—visiting friends and family, exploring the beauty of our country, cruising the oceans, and experiencing the culture and history of foreign countries.  Of course, there are photos documenting every trip.
Grandchildren and great-grandchildren were a special delight, as they reveled in their accomplishment—attending numerous sports events, band concerts, dance recitals, plays, graduations and weddings. Holidays in Yazoo were filled with family, great food (especially Joria’s gumbo) jokes and family tales, and above all love. Lecil’s sense of humor is well-known and he could be counted on to regale a group with hilarious stories and sharp witticisms.
Anyone lucky enough to have met this remarkable couple has been blessed. Their lives well-lived in the service of God serves as a shining example for all. 
“Well done thou> good and faithful servant…”
The family has special thanks for Halcyon
Hospice, Autumn Reeves, Gladys Neely, and Rhonda Lee.
 Survivors are his wife; Joria Miller Lee, daughter; Kathy Lee (Dwight) Dyess of West Point, sons; Wallace Keith (Deborah) Lee of Madison, Kerry Don (Tammy) Lee of Madison, and Kendall Otis (Tondra) Lee of Yazoo City, sisters; Faye Lee of Picayune, and Jackie Lee Rowell of Brandon, grandsons; Brian K. Lee of Madison, Daniel O. Lee of Lexington, Jeffery K. Lee of Canton, Walker Lee Dyess of Tupelo, and David K. Lee of Nashville, TN, granddaughters; Kelsey Lee of Yazoo City, and Laura Lee Hale of Clermont, FL, step-granddaughters; Reagan Ravenstein and Emerald Ravenstein, great-grandchildren; Ayden Cole White, Noah Alexander Salter, Madison Elizabeth Salter, Collin Michael Lee, Nicholas Conner Lee, Alice Elizabeth Hale, Elijah Lee Hale, Christian Jeriah Lee, and Kerry Otis Lee.
Lecil was preceded in death by his parents; Otis M. and Clemmie Jones Lee, brothers Coyt and Garland Lee, and a sister Mabeline Lee Bridges.
Services will be held Tuesday, April 25, 2017 at First Baptist Church in Yazoo City with visitation beginning at 11 a.m., followed by Funeral Services at 1 p.m., internment will follow in Glenwood Cemetery. Rev. Clint Richie will officiate.
Pallbearers will be Brian Lee, Daniel Lee, Jeffery Lee, Walker Dyess, David Lee, Neal Miller, Robert Rowell and  J. T. Rowell
Memorials may be made to; Gideons International, Yazoo Humphreys Camp, P.O. Box 1111, Yazoo City, MS 39194 or  First Baptist Church P.O. Box 780, Yazoo City, MS
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God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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---
The content you're trying to view is available for Premium Content Subscribers only. Online subscription options are available and are complimentary to all existing print subscribers of The YAZOO HERALD. 
 
If you're an existing subscriber (print or digital) and already have your Username and Password, click here: http://bit.ly/1B095Lm
 
If you're an existing print subscriber and need to activate your online account, click here: http://bitly.com/1wHXqwM
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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---
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If you're an existing subscriber (print or digital) and already have your Username and Password, click here: http://bit.ly/1B095Lm
 
If you're an existing print subscriber and need to activate your online account, click here: http://bitly.com/1wHXqwM
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
Austin Barbour, a political and advertising consultant, said YoungWilliams is eager to return to Yazoo City, having been impressed with its workforce and supportive county supervisors. 
“We are very happy to have 35 jobs at the old Fred’s Store in downtown Yazoo City starting on Monday,” Barbour said, during his visit with the Yazoo City Rotary Club. “We think very quickly, in the next couple of months, we are looking at 100 new jobs coming to Yazoo City. That is a big deal.”
YoungWilliams first arrived in Yazoo City in 2009 when it opened a call center in downtown Yazoo City, having acquired a contract with Mississippi Department of Human Services Division of Child Support Enforcement. The center brought in 80 new jobs to the community. 
Unfortunately, the center was force to close when YoungWilliams lost its contract with the state. But this week marks another chance for the business at its former location. 
“Young Williams was once a law firm that morphed into the child support area,” Barbour said. “They were very smart to realize that state and some local governments needed help in handling their child support cases. Young Williams, about 15 or 20 years ago, got into that business. Now they have become the largest private child support company in the country.”
Barbour said the Ridgeland-based company could have easily operated within the Jackson area. But President Rob Wells, who was born and raised in Yazoo City, saw the potential in the downtown area.  
“He (Wells) loved the workforce in Yazoo City,” Barbour said. “I think he got 180 people sending in their applications within the first day or so. The first time that we came and brought these jobs, I remembered we talked to someone with the state department of human services. He said, ‘youre crazy. Don’t go there. That town is falling apart.’ But Wells said this was the right thing to do. And they were fantastic. They did a great job. And we were so happy for that opportunity.”
Barbour said a major key to the center’s success falls with the Yazoo County Board of Supervisors, when he said were “fantastic” in securing the business. 
“They don’t get enough credit,” Barbour said. “I have worked with local elected officials from all around the state. They were so easy to work with. They did a great job. They do deserve the credit.”
Barbour said the call center will not only bring jobs to the community, but it will also give back economically. 
 “These workers still have to eat, buy clothes, go buy insurance,” he said. “It will be more people downtown.”
Barbour said his firm constantly brings Yazoo City to the table when it comes to enticing new businesses and companies. 
“We try to talk to other big businesses to tell them that they have to come look here,” he said. “This is a hidden gem with Yazoo. You got local elected officials who will do anything to get you here.”
 “We are trying to get other people to look at Yazoo City; other big and small businesses,” Barbour added. “Yazoo has the workforce to come in and turn this around. When they see 100 job there, it certainly signals a beacon.”
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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The YoungWilliams child support and customer services call center returns to Yazoo City, bringing in 35 initial jobs at its former downtown location on Monday. 
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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The content you're trying to view is available for Premium Content Subscribers only. Online subscription options are available and are complimentary to all existing print subscribers of The YAZOO HERALD. 
 
If you're an existing subscriber (print or digital) and already have your Username and Password, click here: http://bit.ly/1B095Lm
 
If you're an existing print subscriber and need to activate your online account, click here: http://bitly.com/1wHXqwM
 
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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The content you're trying to view is available for Premium Content Subscribers only. Online subscription options are available and are complimentary to all existing print subscribers of The YAZOO HERALD. 
 
If you're an existing subscriber (print or digital) and already have your Username and Password, click here: http://bit.ly/1B095Lm
 
If you're an existing print subscriber and need to activate your online account, click here: http://bitly.com/1wHXqwM
 
If you're not currently a subscriber, click here for more information about our affordable online subscription options: http://bitly.com/18fdnEp
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
[summary] => [format] => full_html [safe_value] =>
A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
Daniel Ellison, 31, was charged with aggravated assault with a motor vehicle and felony escape. He is currently being held at the Yazoo County Regional Correctional Facility, awaiting another court appearance. 
The incident occurred on East Twelfth Street last Monday. 
“Ellison struck a pedestrian with his vehicle,” said Chief Andre Lloyd. “The victim remains at the University Medical Center at this time, seeking medical attention. The incident is still under investigation as we try to gather all the facts.”
Ellison received a $100,000 bond last Wednesday for the aggravated assault charge. 
“While being brought back to his cell, Ellison fled and escaped out of the Yazoo City Police Department,” Lloyd said. “But he was quickly detained by Yazoo City officers near Gilberts Lumber.”
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A suspect remains behind bars after he allegedly struck a pedestrian with his vehicle and later escaped from the police department after his initial court appearance. 
) ) ) [display_submitted] => 1 [submitted] => Submitted by jamiepatterson on Fri, 04/21/2017 - 4:24pm [user_picture] => [is_mobile] => [is_tablet] => [is_handheld] => )

Virginia Dixon

Virginia Dale Stubblefield Dixon,82, of Vaughan passed away Monday April 24, 2017 in Ridgeland. She was the daughter of James Dale and Virginia O'Reilly Stubblefield.

Lecil Lee

God, Family, AMCO—Lecil Lystra Lee gave his heart and soul to each one without reservation. Coming from a long line of Christians, his love of God and willingness to spread the Good News of Jesus Christ came naturally and wholeheartedly. 

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